As you age, your risk for certain diseases and health conditions changes. Regular check-ups and screenings help to catch warning signs early on – the earlier a health issue is detected, the easier it is to treat. To keep yourself in top shape, here’s a handy guide to important medical tests and screenings you should get throughout your life.

health screenings by age infographic

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In Your 20’s

Women:

  • Eye Exam – every 1-2 years – tests for vision, glaucoma, and macular degeneration
  • Hearing Test – every 10 years – tests ear function
  • Blood Pressure Screening – every 2 years – tests risk for  heart conditions
  • Skin Exam – yearly – tests for signs of skin cancer
  • Pelvic Exam – yearly – checks for signs of cancer
  • Pap Smear – every 3 years – tests risk for cervical cancer

Men:

  • Eye Exam – every 1-2 years – tests for vision, glaucoma, and macular degeneration
  • Hearing Test – every 10 years – tests ear function
  • Blood Pressure Screening – every 2 years – tests risk for  heart conditions
  • Skin Exam – yearly – tests for signs of skin cancer
  • Testicular Exam – yearly – tests for signs of testicular cancer

 

In Your 30’s

Women:

  • Blood Pressure Screening – every 2 years – tests risk for  heart conditions
  • Skin Exam – yearly – tests for signs of skin cancer
  • Pelvic Exam – yearly – checks for signs of cancer
  • Pap Smear – every 3 years – tests risk for cervical cancer
  • Blood Glucose Test – every 5 years – tests risk for diabetes
  • Cholesterol Screening – every 5 years – tests risk for heart disease
  • Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Test – every few years – tests for underactive or overactive thyroid

Men:

  • Blood Pressure Screening – every 2 years – tests risk for  heart conditions
  • Skin Exam – yearly – tests for signs of skin cancer
  • Testicular Exam – yearly – tests for signs of testicular cancer
  • Blood Glucose Test – every 5 years – tests risk for diabetes
  • Cholesterol Screening – every 5 years – tests risk for heart disease

 

In Your 40’s

Women:

  • Blood Pressure Screening – every 2 years – tests risk for  heart conditions
  • Skin Exam – yearly – tests for signs of skin cancer
  • Pelvic Exam – yearly – checks for signs of cancer
  • Pap Smear – every 3 years – tests risk for cervical cancer
  • Blood Glucose Test – every 3 years – tests risk for diabetes
  • Cholesterol Screening – yearly – tests for signs of heart disease
  • Bone Density Testing – every 3 years – tests for signs of osteoporosis
  • Mammogram – yearly – tests for signs of breast cancer
  • Ovarian Screening – every 3 years for post-menopausal women – tests for signs of ovarian cancer

Men:

  • Blood Pressure Screening – every 2 years – tests risk for  heart conditions
  • Skin Exam – yearly – tests for signs of skin cancer
  • Testicular Exam – yearly – tests for signs of testicular cancer
  • Blood Glucose Test – every 3 years – tests risk for diabetes
  • Cholesterol Screening – yearly – tests for signs of heart disease
  • Prostate Exam – if high risk of prostate cancer

 

In Your 50’s

Women:

  • Blood Pressure Screening – every 2 years – tests risk for  heart conditions
  • Pelvic Exam – yearly – checks for signs of cancer
  • Pap Smear – every 3 years – tests risk for cervical cancer
  • Blood Glucose Test – every 3 years – tests risk for diabetes
  • Cholesterol Screening – every year – tests for signs of heart disease
  • Bone Density Testing – every 3 years – tests for signs of osteoporosis
  • Mammogram – yearly – tests for signs of breast cancer
  • Ovarian Screening – every 3 years – tests for signs of ovarian cancer
  • Coronary Screening – yearly – tests for heart disease
  • Colonoscopy – every 10 years – tests for colorectal cancer, or precancerous polyps
  • Fecal Occult Blood Test – yearly – tests for early signs of colon cancer

Men:

  • Blood Pressure Screening – every 2 years – tests risk for  heart conditions
  • Testicular Exam – every 3 years – tests for signs of testicular cancer
  • Blood Glucose Test – every 3 years – tests risk for diabetes
  • Cholesterol Screening – yearly – tests for signs of heart disease
  • Colonoscopy – every 3 years – tests for colorectal cancer, or precancerous polyps
  • Prostate Screening – every 3 years – test for prostate cancer

 

In Your 60’s and Older

Women:

  • Blood Pressure Screening – every 2 years – tests risk for  heart conditions
  • Pelvic Exam – yearly – checks for signs of cancer
  • Pap Smear – every 3 years – tests risk for cervical cancer
  • Blood Glucose Test – every 3 years – tests risk for diabetes
  • Cholesterol Screening – every year – tests for signs of heart disease
  • Mammogram – yearly – tests for signs of breast cancer
  • Colonoscopy – every 5 years – tests for precancerous polyps, and cancer
  • Colorectal Screening – every 5 years
  • Ovarian Screening – every 3 years – tests for signs of ovarian cancer
  • Coronary Screening – yearly – tests for heart disease
  • Fecal Occult Blood Test – yearly – tests for early signs of colon cancer
  • Colorectal Screening – every 3 years
  • Bone Density Testing – every 2-3 years – tests for signs of osteoporosis
  • Herpes Booster – once – prevents shingles
  • Pneumonia – once – protects against pneumonia

Men:

  • Blood Pressure Screening – every 2 years – tests risk for  heart conditions
  • Blood Glucose Test – every 3 years – tests risk for diabetes
  • Cholesterol Screening – yearly – tests for signs of heart disease
  • Colonoscopy – every 3 years – tests for colorectal cancer, or precancerous polyps
  • Hearing Test – every 3 years – ear function
  • Prostate Screening – every 3 years – tests for prostate cancer
  • Testicular Exam – every 3 years – tests for signs of testicular cancer
  • Coronary Screening – yearly – tests for heart disease
  • Herpes Booster – once – prevents shingles
  • Pneumonia – once – protects against pneumonia

 

Disclaimer: This is an approximate timeline, and does not represent a complete list of possible health screenings. The age and frequency of screenings may change based on your personal health risks and family history. Talk to your doctor to determine which medical tests are right for you.